Saturday, April 16, 2011

Some Thoughts about Being Filipino

Before you think I’m ashamed of being Filipino, let me say I just believe many stupid things that people popularly believe as “Filipino” are not Filipino at all. They’re just misconceptions thrown to us by a devious media. I am Filipino no matter what culture I take and what practices I have in life. Being of a different culture or mindset doesn’t make me any less Filipino.

This shows you how easy it is to put 'Filipino' on anything you want and get away with it

I speak English better than I speak Tagalog or whatever my regional ethnic language is. So what? I’m still Filipino.

I boycott Wowowee, Willing Willie, local telenovelas, local news and local media. So what? I’m still Filipino.

I watch anime and foreign programs instead of local programs. So what? I’m still Filipino.

I don’t give blowouts during my birthday or I don’t prepare bongga handaans (lavish dinners) during an event. So what? I’m still Filipino.

I don’t use firecrackers to celebrate New Year’s Eve because I don’t want my house, money or fingers to burn. So what? I’m still Filipino.

I refuse to give dole outs to the squatter areas. So what? I’m still Filipino.

I don’t send home balikbayan boxes as an OFW, because it’s too expensive and impractical for my case. So what? I’m still Filipino.

Do we really need this?

So what if I don’t listen to love songs, and prefer exciting, fast heavy metal or other music? And so what if I don’t like videoke or karaoke? I’m still Filipino.

Even if I seem to be an overly logical person and would rather think critically than let my emotions do the thinking, I’m still Filipino.

I don’t follow fads, or go with what’s popular with fellow Filipinos. So what? I’m still Filipino.

I don’t believe in pakikisama, since it means you sacrifice your integrity or personal preferences just to conform to your barkada or group. So what? I’m still Filipino.

I don’t use authoritarianism, don’t teach my kids to use “po” or “opo,” don’t teach them the mano tradition or I don’t raise them the traditional way, but use modern parenting methods. So what? I’m still Filipino.

I avoid the rich foods like lechon and bulalo, and prefer healthier food that tend to be “imported” or foreign products. So what? I’m still Filipino.

I believe the jeepney should be eliminated or reduced as a form of transportation to improve our poor metro traffic situation. So what? I’m still Filipino.

I refrain from inumans at the kanto or even with friends who keep pestering me about it. So what? I’m still Filipino.

I side with a foreigner who has been wronged by a Filipino, and I help out in catching the Filipino miscreant. So what? I’m still Filipino.

I would rather hire the guy I don’t know but is qualified for the job, instead of choosing some kamag-anak, kakilala or ka-shooting club for the job. So what? I’m still Filipino.

Teach your kids to question local media's views about what is 'Filipino'

I’m not fond of basketball or boxing and prefer other sports, or don’t really watch sports at all. So what? I’m still Filipino.

I am not a fan of Manny Pacquiao and refuse to say “I’m Proud to be Pinoy because of Manny.” So what? I’m still Filipino.

I believe our culture is filled with a lot of trash and we’re doing the wrong things compared to what our neighbors like Singapore and Indonesia are doing. So what? I’m still Filipino.

Heck, even if I don’t say “I’m Proud to be Filipino,” or “the Filipino Race is superior,” I’m still Filipino.

No matter how un-Filipino or anti-Filipino I seem to you, I will boldy declare that I am still, and will always be, a Filipino.

So what makes me Filipino? My desire to see my country’s system fixed, and my country’s culture transformed into one that is more respectable.


About the Author

ChinoF

ChinoF has written 38 stories on this site.

Chino, a freelance writer and aspiring artist, believes that Filipino culture is dominated by backward, repressive, corrupt and defective elements. Thus, if you want to correct these problems, you often have to go against what people believe as "right" and is accepted in Filipino culture. You also risk being called "anti-Pinoy" this way, even if you're not. But he takes the risk anyway. Hence he feels at home in this blog site. Chino is also a former Google Answers Researcher who went by the username techtor-ga.


160 Comments on “Some Thoughts about Being Filipino”

  • nitesoul wrote on 22 November, 2010, 15:58

    i don’t really care what your beliefs are. heck, i don’t even care if you “boldly declare you’re a Filipino”. have you stayed here in this country that most Filipinos gave up on? people who’d rather teach their kids the western ways or teachings and totally forget to let them know that “PO” and “OPO” and “pagmamano” is a way of showing RESPECT to the elders, i don’t even care if you don’t care about this country. in short, WALA DIN AKONG PAKIALAM KUNG ANO ANG INIISIP MO TUNGKOL SA MGA PILIPINONG NANDITO SA PILIPINAS DAHIL YOU DON’T KNOW **** ABOUT THE HARDSHIPS WE ARE HAVING HERE! i respect your thoughts and all. i respect you as someone who says na Pilipino ka pero hindi ka ata lumaki dito. i don’t care. i respect your honesty. but be careful with what you’re saying against the people you declare as KABABAYANS. i don’t care kung ano pinagsasabi mo about us PInoy’s here. you are living in a “FIRST CLASS COUNTRY”, and we are not. but that DEFINITELY doesn’t make us less human and indifferent. eh ano ngayon kung people here say that “they’re proud of being Pinoy because of PacMan”? what do you care? did you PROUDLY and OPENLY declared your race before? or after the Pacmanians here erupted and got you pissed? i don’t give a damn about people who already gave up on this country. kanya-kanya lang yan. kung wala kang paki sa mga taong nandito, better not speak about them, ganyan din ang mga makapili. talk about the people who are in your country or state. PEACE.

    [Reply]

    Aegis-Judex Reply:

    What is race, but a construct of illusions?

    [Reply]

    Angel Reply:

    @ – Wow dude. Not only did you miss the boat…you walked off the dock…Filipinos like you make me ashamed to be a Filipino.

    [Reply]

    nitesoul Reply:

    then be so. i did not miss the boat. like i said, i get the point. but then again, i just want to have some caution because not everyone can understand what he is saying. i am not against a word he said, but then again, i know a lot of my kababayans will be hurt by the words he said. i know that one of the things that this country needs is a strong slap on the face to wake up, stand up and move forward. kung ikinahihiya mong maging pilipino dahil sakin, pakialam ko? you’re not me. you don’t know me. hell, i don’t know you either.

    [Reply]

    ChinoF

    ChinoF Reply:

    “have you stayed here in this country…”

    But I am here, in QC. :P

    [Reply]

    boo hoo Reply:

    ‘WALA DIN AKONG PAKIALAM KUNG ANO ANG INIISIP MO TUNGKOL SA MGA PILIPINONG NANDITO SA PILIPINAS DAHIL YOU DON’T KNOW **** ABOUT THE HARDSHIPS WE ARE HAVING HERE!’

    For clarification, are you suggesting that one can only be considered a true Filipino if he or she has experienced the hardships you were talking about? And with ‘hardships’ did you mean unemployment, homelessness and hunger to mention a few? If so, I think it is unfair to those Pinoys working hard to provide for themselves and their family, thus being able to afford simple luxuries. Being Filipino does not mean you have to live a difficult life.

    ChinoF – Thanks for this good article. My sentiments exactly. I just hope readers take a moment or two to digest it, so that they don’t keep missing the point. :)

    [Reply]

    ChinoF

    ChinoF Reply:

    Thanks. I really hope they do digest it.

    [Reply]

    Jay Reply:

    @

    Then a good thing to do is be a nigger. Similar kind of culture to pinoys in general, always being in hardship, not giving a **** about improving their lives and always playing the victim card for their self inflicted pain and torture (you’d wonder if they are masochists). Oh and being AS IGNANT [note: ignorant] AS POSSIBLE!. In fact, Pinoys in general are the niggers of South-East Asia.

    Oh and I’m not being racist by any means. There are successful african americans who raised families in nice communities and have wonderful careers and would NEVER COME BACK to DA HOOD. So nitesoul, Stop making MY PHILIPPINES into a hood then we can talk. Otherwise, you can rot there for the rest of your life trying to feed yourself and your family with your being pinoyness, that we both share as a common trait. Because we were both brought into the world as Filipinos.

    [Reply]

    booboo Reply:

    yes, you can call Philippines as the “niggers” of South-East Asia. you know why? because selfish filipinos abroad doesnt help them become something more, the politicians doesnt help them be something more. your talking about “MY PHILIPPINES”, but the F do YOU do for them?

    in the hard life they have out there, they are happy with simple things as Pacman being a champion, singing kareoke with their friends, once in a while eating something luxurious, once a year have a bongang party to make them feel like theyre someone, watch willing willie because its a happy show that can make them feel happy for a moment in their hard reality, letting your kamaganak get the job because u want ur family to get better.

    dont u think EVERY filipino wants our country fixed? what do u mean that u want a respected culture? are u ashamed of our culture? are u ashamed that FILIPINOS are proud of pacman? are u ashamed that we sing kareoke? are u ashemed that filipinos like basketball? you maybe filipino by blood, but you are sure NOT FILIPINO BY HEART!

    stop complaining and start doing something for those in our country. this stupid post just show how selfish u are. OFW doesnt do anything for us. they come back here and are mayabang and show-off that they have money. yes indeed, you worked hard for your money, but how do u think it feels for the filipinos that doesnt have nothing because they havent been given the chance? u think ur fancy huh?

    if what u wrote about filipinos is what u think of us. dont come back here and look fancy.

    ChinoF

    ChinoF Reply:

    “OFW doesnt do anything for us. they come back here and are mayabang and show-off that they have money.”

    How ungrateful to the people who feed their families. While OFWs work their asses off, their spouses philander with other women or men. You may want to reconsider your opinion with facts. ;)

    deusX Reply:

    @ booboo

    YOU don’t help become something more. Your job is to complain, let the others do the work. I agree with Chino. I’m a Filipino by heart, not a stereotype Filipino people like you show the world.

    Birdigator Reply:

    I hope you don’t mean that living in hardship and suffering has become so integral to Filipino culture that to be considered a Filipino and have one’s opinions(no matter how ill- or well-meaning) considered and accepted by the general Filipino public, you have to live, or used to live in the same hardship and suffering in the same shanty or overcrowded townhouse?

    So should we all strive to live in hardship and suffer to be Filipino? That it is -proper- to be poor, and that living in comfort in ‘first class’ conditions invalidates whatever I have to say?

    No wonder the majority are content to live in poverty. ‘Mahirap lang ako, anong magagawa ko’, as they say. One small, first step could be to not be dependent on your own children as a source of income, hindering their own growth and development. One thing that has always puzzled me are those parents still below retirement age who stop working as soon as one or two of their kids graduate or get a job, and expect that kid to support them and all his other brothers and sisters.

    [Reply]

    ChinoF

    ChinoF Reply:

    You know, that’s exactly the baloney that media is spewing out that is helping keep our country poor. It’s like, being Filipino means you should be poor and suffer. If you are well-off, you’re not Filipino, or evil at least. Yes, it helps bring about contentment in poverty, which is keeping our country in bad straits indeed.

    Pilosopo mode: Thing is, Somalians, Nigerians and even bag people in the U.S. are poor and suffering. Does that make them Filipino? :P

    [Reply]

    blueredicedtea Reply:

    after reading this article
    omg i love you chino <3 in a platonic way okay?

    @
    ." you are living in a “FIRST CLASS COUNTRY”, and we are not."
    no chino is living in a first class planet called nede and he is having a form of ideology there called "chinocracy".

    "WALA DIN AKONG PAKIALAM KUNG ANO ANG INIISIP MO TUNGKOL SA MGA PILIPINONG NANDITO SA PILIPINAS DAHIL YOU DON’T KNOW **** ABOUT THE HARDSHIPS WE ARE HAVING HERE"

    bakit kayo lang ba ang nakakaalam ng paghihirap nyo?
    wala ba silang karapatan ituro ang pagkakamali natin?
    thats why chino rejected our s-hitty culture.

    eh ano ngayon kung people here say that “they’re proud of being Pinoy because of PacMan”? what do you care? did you PROUDLY and OPENLY declared your race before?

    race?
    you mean illegal racing? there's always one at wangan or mount akina

    anyways about that, if chino "proudly and openly declared his race" he will be no different from the ku klux klan or any other white supremacists bastards there
    and the concept of race has already been debunked by science (thank goodness for science)
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Human_Genome_Project

    maliban na lang kung ka speciest sya ni chino…sa planetang nede .hehehehehehe
    im just kidding there chino i have no hard feelings to you :P

    "i don’t care kung ano pinagsasabi mo about us PInoy’s here"

    why do you post this in the first place
    when you don't care about topic starter's ramblings?

    [Reply]

    blueredicedtea Reply:

    oh wait, a more appropriate link for those who are proud of their race:
    http://antipinoy.com/video-the-human-genome-project-race-and-pinoy-racism-say-no-to-racism/

    [Reply]

    ChinoF

    ChinoF Reply:

    Easy on the love… some people might be getting ideas… LOL.

    You got that right… people trying to declare pride for their race are stuck in the 1800s…. while the 1930s-40s saw the worst form of this in Europe.

    [Reply]

    Julian Makabayan Reply:

    my dear nitesoul:
    your anger is deafening. you are just suffering the consequences of not admitting the ills of being Filipino.
    even your arguments on shutting up if we do not approve of these many ills are irrational and truly “filipinistic’ (if ever there is such a word).
    it’s about time you and the rest of the country wake up.
    God bless.

    [Reply]

  • ulong pare
    ulong pare wrote on 22 November, 2010, 16:01

    inferiority complex >>> flips who deny or are ashamed to be one… no identity, lost in the sea of immigrants toiling the land of meek and homey oooopsie milk and honey… mga gung gongs!

    [Reply]

    BongV

    BongV Reply:

    ser – please send JSO application form in BISDAK… :) )

    [Reply]

    ulong pare

    ulong pare Reply:

    daaaaang! i administered a Defense Language Profiency Test (DLPT) – “tausug” – to a blondie (yep, 6-footer, blonde, blue eyed whitey); he did very well… i was extremely jealous…. i still could not comprehend flips not enjoying their talents… damn you, ‘merkans!

    [Reply]

    ulong pare

    ulong pare Reply:

    pahabol: proficiency ‘yan ha!? i know flips would kwestyon my ejumakasyon if ay dont korekek it….

  • UP nn grad wrote on 22 November, 2010, 17:44

    That is an inspiring logo with “Filipino” on top, the flag in the middle and “Pride” in the red ribbon-type item. Somebody should manufacture half-a-million T-shirts with that logo on the left chest or on the right sleeve, I bet that many “I am Proud!”-pinoys would be proud to wear it.

    I wonder how many know that it is against a Republic Act something-something (on the proper way to honor the National Anthem and other symbols of the Filipino nation) for a civilian-Filipino to use the flag as part of clothing, such is the pride of the old-timer lawmakers of Pilipinas.

    [Reply]

    nitesoul Reply:

    heard that too. being proud of your country will cost you your freedom…

    [Reply]

    UP nn grad Reply:

    For your entertainment (and for serious thought). Pinoys making sisi for all that don’t go right.

    http://www.youtube.com/user/tv5theeveningnews#p/u/3/-GUz53kWpxk

    [Reply]

    luraaa Reply:

    Lourd ftw. I love these type of shows. I hope this wouldn’t be canceled though.

    [Reply]

    ChinoF

    ChinoF Reply:

    Republic Act No. 8491 – The National Symbols Code

    [Reply]

    luraaa Reply:

    Yes to this one. I’ve been seeing a lot of shirts that has the Filipino flag imprinted in them, and I’ve been wondering since then if this is not against the law. It feels like losing respect for the flag. If a Filipino is proud to be a Filipino, they don’t show it, they do it.

    [Reply]

  • dumb-oh wrote on 22 November, 2010, 18:44

    ‘have you stayed here in this country…’
    translation: MAKISAMA KA. Magdusa ka kasama namin.
    If I’m not mistaken, the author is STILL in the Philippines.

    Respect to elders? Ayun, pinoys are taught to obey the elders, kahit mali. Hence, the “Anak lang kita” expressions. Lol.

    I tried telling my parents to stop making handa this holiday. Hala, huwag ko daw kontrahin ang tradisyon. Puta naman, nung isang araw lang nagrereklamo lang sila na kulang ang pera. Tangnang tradisyon yan.

    [Reply]

    nitesoul Reply:

    well, traditions are different. respect has boundaries too. hindi na tayo bata to know the difference. we can start on ourselves. we can start with our kids.

    [Reply]

    Chorvaqueen Reply:

    Then is it safe to say to leave those idiotic parents? Sure why not? I’d do it.
    They say they have no money and yet manages to throw some feast all because of tradition?

    Yeah. I could see any progress. You know, just because it’s been there for a long time doesn’t mean it’s the absolute truth and should be done at any cost.

    Respect? Yeah. Self respect, I have it.

    [Reply]

    Chorvaqueen Reply:

    Then is it safe to say to leave those idiotic parents? Sure why not? I’d do it.
    They say they have no money and yet manages to throw some feast all because of tradition?

    Yeah. I could see any progress in this (read:sarcasm). You know, just because it’s been there for a long time doesn’t mean it’s the absolute truth and should be done at any cost.

    Respect? Yeah. Self respect, I have it.

    [Reply]

    ChinoF

    ChinoF Reply:

    “Tangnang tradisyon yan.”

    My sentiments exactly!!!

    [Reply]

    ChinoF

    ChinoF Reply:

    To add, people should learn to question the traditions in our society. As described by dumb-oh, people insist on following traditions that make them poor, and yet they complain that life is hard. It’s like willingly going through that Holy Week crucifixion thing and yet wondering why it hurts. It’s one of the reasons why our country is beaten down and backward. It’s not corruption for me; I would cite this attitude as a bigger cause.

    [Reply]

    Jay Reply:

    translation: MAKISAMA KA. Magdusa ka kasama namin

    NOW THIS WHAT YOU CALL CRAB MENTALITY! You want to break out of the bad traditions because you have the education and the common sense to see the difference. But when you do, the people try pull you back because instead of swallowing their pride, they would rather stick to their failed guns and drag those who know better along for the ride.

    Not the kind of stupid example when you think critically about someone’s success because mainstream pinoys try to pull other pinoys success with them. Everyone will be less crabby if they do more and learn to take in values that work.

    [Reply]

  • Chi Chi wrote on 22 November, 2010, 22:11

    AWESOME! I have this t-shirt Pili-****in-pinas..I like wearing it a lot..even its a bit too big for me..since it was actually my brothers..

    [Reply]

  • Chi Chi wrote on 22 November, 2010, 22:17

    4datruth posted on Nov 23, 2010 11:01 AM

    for the people….for the people, and for the people….. Champ Pacquiao for President in 2022…. if he wins, the people’s welfare will always be the forefront of his presidency the way he speaks of their well-being…. Go…Go…Go… Manny…focus your sight at Malacanang…and once again, re-write history…
    Report abuse | Reply

    OH MY GOD…ERAP,FPJ..BOBONG ARTISTAS?MANNY?…..thank goodness for antipinoy

    [Reply]

    Anonymous Bosch Reply:

    And Willie follows suit…

    [Reply]

    Chorvaqueen Reply:

    inb4 Manny vs Kris

    If this happens, I’ll provoke best korea to nuke us.

    [Reply]

    Jay Reply:

    Yes, America has put the Bush father/son combo, Reagan and Obama for presidents. But only da Philippines do you get:

    Actors as governors/Senators/congresspeople who gets NO BILLS PASSED!

    An athlete as a congressman.

    Members of bayan-bayan land barons in politics! Hell, the estupido alpha is the president of Philippines! At least Bush had balls to **** around with other nations. The smiling dog can’t even put the supposed corrupt president and the her regime under arrest for her crimes (as attested by his army of witnesses) and save foreigners from a mad man due to his brand of no-accountancy politics!

    [Reply]

  • bokyo wrote on 22 November, 2010, 22:39

    OffTopic – that Filipino biscuit tasted good, in fairness :D

    OnTopic – That makes question “What makes one a True Filipino?” Is it by birthright, by belief, by “hardship experienced”, or by association?

    [Reply]

    bubi78 Reply:

    Pro Deo et Patria is the motto of my alma mater… I never cared much about it back then but somehow it got stuck in my subconscious mind because, in hindsight, I realized that ever since I tried to live my life by that guiding principle. That and the prayer that goes, “To give and not to count the cost/ To fight and not to heed the wounds…” must have trickled down to my mind and instilled in me a deep sense of responsibility for my actions, for my words, and for my dealings with other people.

    “But what has that to do with my being a Filipino? Where is the connection?” you might ask. Again, I go back to what was taught to us in school. I am a Filipino because it is the home of my birth and the home of my people. I need not go into semantics nor engage in a rhetorical tussle with anyone because that for me will suffice; simple yet to the point. For God and Country.

    [Reply]

    bokyo Reply:

    teka, yan yung motto ng alma mater ko ah!

    Yan ba yung may “run , jump, shout, but don’t sin?” :D

    [Reply]

    bubi78 Reply:

    hahaha whatever you say dude! I’ll keep my God to myself and give what I’ve got to my country. Fair enough, wouldn’t you say?

    peste Reply:

    (Pilosopo mode on)
    Buti nga yan e may “et Patria” pa. Yung iba, “Primum Regnum Dei,” “Lux in Domino,” et cetera: wala nang panahong para sa “Patria.”
    (Pilosopo mode off)

    [Reply]

    ChinoF

    ChinoF Reply:

    I’ve always wanted to taste that Filipinos choco. Yeah, I heard it’s good. It’s funny that some even Pinoys complained about it, when there’s nothing wrong about it at all.

    By the way, on topic two… I would answer that with the last line of my article here.

    [Reply]

    bokyo Reply:

    Noting that some Flips might raise “RED FLAG” on the biscuit name when Austrians and Germans don’t give a dang about “Vienna Sausage” and “German Cut”

    [Reply]

    Maki_Alam Reply:

    It’s ’cause the biscuits are brown on the outside and white on the inside. Natamaan ang Pinoy dun. Sapul! :D

    bokyo Reply:

    I also tasted the white choco flavor . I called it “Filipinong naka-Glutathione” :D

    And also the mocha flavored, with the rich taste. It’s the “Elite Filipino” :D

    Too bad it didn’t lasted long when I bought a box back home :(

    ChinoF

    ChinoF Reply:

    Hmmm…. I’m really interested in getting a sample of this choco… is it available at Duty Free?

  • Crash wrote on 23 November, 2010, 1:07

    Asus.
    Nagdrama ang lolo.

    Bumabawi.

    Sino namang hunghang ang nagdeklara na kasama sa pagka-Pilipino ang panonood ng Wowowee at Telenovela?

    Wag ka nang magpumilit na Pilipino ka pa rin. Wala naman kaming pakialam kung gusto mong i-associate sarili mo sa mga trying hard na nagfifeeling-Kano e.

    Ika nga, “Isalaksak mo sa baga mo, men.”

    [Reply]

    ChinoF

    ChinoF Reply:

    “Sino namang hunghang ang nagdeklara na kasama sa pagka-Pilipino ang panonood ng Wowowee at Telenovela?”

    Kaya nga eh. Pero merong ganun. Isa na diyan si Willie. :P

    [Reply]

    Jay Reply:

    Wag ka nang magpumilit na Pilipino ka pa rin. Wala naman kaming pakialam kung gusto mong i-associate sarili mo sa mga trying hard na nagfifeeling-Kano e

    Isa tong tinamaan ng tanga o! Kung pina anak kang pinoy, pero bingyan ka ng values ng mga Kano, ibig sabihin associated ka parin sa kanila? Ganyan talaga mag isip ang gago. Parating discrimination dinadaan ang katwiran para lamang itanggol ang kanyang insecurity at inferiority! Eh saan na ang pinoy superiority? Kahit sila, hindi nila ari ang lupa at negosyo ng kanilang bansa!

    So ang ginagawa ng mga katulad mung gunggong ay inaasociate mo ang paghihirap at makitid na isip na bilang Pang pinoy lang, tulad ng palpak na pala isipan na ‘Pinoy Pride’. Eh, walang magagawa kung pinananganak tayong pinoy eh! Pwede ka mawala ng respeto at muhinan ang mga tulad ikaw, hindi dahil sa lahi at dahil sa pagiging ignorante at selfish mo.

    Ikaw ang may ayaw, ikaw na rin ang maging prejudice.

    Para sa iyo pre ang pinagbagong tagline na Putangina! Kay tanga! adj: so stupid!

    [Reply]

  • Birdigator wrote on 23 November, 2010, 2:01

    I’d like to add one of my own:

    I don’t get overly offended, hurt or take it personally when I’m reprimanded, criticised or have my mistakes and shortcomings pointed out to me. So what? I’m still Filipino.

    [Reply]

    ChinoF

    ChinoF Reply:

    Balat-sibuyas, hehe. Good one.

    [Reply]

  • manzi wrote on 23 November, 2010, 2:15

    I don’t get the idea behind the drive of Pinoys during Fiestas and other special occasions. Isipin mo magpapataba ka ng baboy sa halip na ibenta mo at bumili pa ng dalawa eh kakatayin mo at ipakain sa iba ng libre. yung iba nga mangungutang pa para may handa lang. nagtanong ako sa kakilala ko. bakit DAPAT may handa? ang sagot? Nakakahiya kasi kung wala parang kang kawawa. eh kako mas kawawa ka dahil nawalan ka na ng baboy may utang ka pa.

    Di rin ako nanonood ng anything local. there’s a very very fine line between balita and showbiz. minsan puro na lang drama ang nasa TV nakakabobo na. Naiisip ko tuloy that we’re a nation of masochistic martyrs.. iyak ng iyak and loving every minute of it.

    [Reply]

    ChinoF

    ChinoF Reply:

    “Nakakahiya kasi kung wala parang kang kawawa.”

    Fear of shame has been one of the motivating factors for Filipinos to follow traditions and make decisions that are tantamount to shooting themselves in the foot. This kind of fear is best eliminated.

    [Reply]

    manzi Reply:

    Saving face is deeply ingrained in our dysfunctional cultural psyche. Di kaya ng ego ng Pinoy na hindi magpa-BIBO. It’s been drilled to the nubile minds of the young. the flashier the better. ayos lang na magutuman ang importante pogi pa rin. may kakilala akong ganyan dati sa iskul di na kumakain ng lunch para may pang-gasolina lang. eh isang sakay lang naman ng trisikad/tricycle/kuliglig ang diperensiya ng bahay niya at eskwelahan. yun nga lang may “reputasyon” daw siyang kailangan panindigan.

    makikita mo yan sa mga bagets ngayon na tumatambay sa coffee shop. ilang oras nakatunganga diyan kumpleto rekados parang billboard na ang katawan dahil lantaran ang branded na kasuotan. Some will take it one step further by engaging in pseudo-intellectual discussions while wearing non-prescription glasses.

    yun nga lang 3hrs na tambay is equal to 1 order. usually yung pinakamura sa menu. pero ayos lang yun dahil obvious naman kung ano ang habol nila.

    ang prestige na makita at marinig habang nakatambay sila sa coffee shop. walang nakakita? no problem! may facebook, may twitter atsaka may blog. o sige starbucks na lang masyadong general ang “coffee shop” eh.

    [Reply]

  • Maki_Alam wrote on 23 November, 2010, 3:17

    “we’re a nation of masochistic martyrs.. iyak ng iyak and loving every minute of it.”

    Hay, sinabi mo pa.

    I also don’t understand why we bend over backwards to have Pinoy criminals in other countries acquitted or pardoned.

    [Reply]

    manzi Reply:

    we bend over for our criminals and we sodomize the world with our celebrities. ayos no?

    [Reply]

    Jay Reply:

    The same reason why Politicians and presidents in our country pardon murderers, usurpers of rebellions and such.

    [Reply]

  • Hailey wrote on 23 November, 2010, 4:30

    Wag na mag-away. Everyone is entitled to their opinion and we must respect that.

    Give love! Mas madaming issues ang bansa natin kesa dito. Magkaisa na lang tayo.

    Maligayang pasko sa inyo.

    [Reply]

    aboy Reply:

    “Everyone is entitled to their opinion and we must respect that. ” – hindi ako agree… – but I’m still a Filipino… may opinion na galing sa pure emotions lang at ni katiting na critical na pag-iisip ay wala…

    “Mas madaming issues ang bansa natin kesa dito. Magkaisa na lang tayo.” – hindi din ako agree.. – but I’m still a Filipino… pre panahon pa ni Makoy ganyan na sigaw ng pinoy… Tapos na ang Edsa tsong, pero dilaw na dilaw pa din ang tunog… tigil na natin yung salita ganito, katunong lang din yan ng “I’m Proud to be a Filipino”.

    [Reply]

    Dencio Reply:

    ikaw na ang critical thinkerer. lupet mo dre idol-eng :)

    [Reply]

    Hailey Reply:

    Aking irerespeto kung ang iyong tanging mungkahi ay mag-negate ng mga sinasabi ng ibang tao. Hindi ako makikipag-argumento sa iyo.

    Nawa ay magkaron ka ng masayang pamumuhay.. :)

    [Reply]

    ChinoF

    ChinoF Reply:

    Maligayang Pasko din… wag lang sanang Paskong magastos… magtimpi naman sa handaan… hehe.

    [Reply]

    Jay Reply:

    ang isang argument po ay hindi awayan. Kundi lamang ibang paraan ng pag isip o pag present ng punto ninyo.

    Syempre may opinyon, pero may mga FACTS. Wala sa respeto ang opinyon. You earn respect, not give it.

    Magkaisa tayo na pinoy dahil pinanganak tayo na ganun. Kasalanan yun ng mga magulang natin, o tinuturing natin magulang.

    [Reply]

  • Joshua07 wrote on 23 November, 2010, 5:05

    An impressive article, a must-share….. Just teaches you that we are still Filipinos, even with our preferences to follow other cultures, like those of the Singaporeans……

    [Reply]

  • Tish wrote on 23 November, 2010, 6:20

    My sentiments exactly. Let’s all keep an open mind. Instead of taking offense when someone declares something we don’t agree with, ask why? is it true? Modern day activists use technology such as blogs, facebook, etc to spread awareness and encourage change. Reminds me of Rizal and Del Pilar who used ink as weapon to help liberate the Philippines from Spain.

    [Reply]

    ChinoF

    ChinoF Reply:

    Today, it’s more like Rizal and Del Pilar were not liberating the Philippines from Spain (they actually wanted better treatment from homeland Spain, historians say)… they were liberating the Filipinos from themselves, same as we’re doing today. ;)

    [Reply]

    Tish Reply:

    True! How can we liberate such stubborn, narrow-minded people? I know that I am not always right but it irks me when some people become defensive and judgemental. Would not even bother to consider what the other person is trying to say- instead- blunt disagreement. Hey, I read an article (not sure) somewhere criticizing the view that “everyone has their own opinion”- can you point me to the right direction please?

    [Reply]

  • Beach wrote on 23 November, 2010, 6:29

    I do not like to gossip, I do not care about my colleagues’ private affairs, I do not kiss ass! I try not to get envious when a colleague gets promoted, so what? I am still a Filipino

    [Reply]

    ChinoF

    ChinoF Reply:

    Sorry for the late reply… now that a good one!

    [Reply]

    Jay Reply:

    YOu and I are born as one. You and I will die as one. Now the rest of the tapeworm sycophants didn’t see that last point coming :P

    [Reply]

  • Caly wrote on 23 November, 2010, 6:31

    great article.. we don’t need to be like that because that is our culture. for being a filipino ,we need to bring back the same Philippines back 4 decades ago.. a country that helps each other to make the country competitive. a philippines with a great leader, with full of hope and a people with unity. i hope that this website will spread nationwide to enlighten the minds of our fellows that was brainwashed by the incompetent media and its number 1 ratings “kuno”.

    [Reply]

    Anonymous Bosch Reply:

    I guess we are still the same Philippines as it was 40 years ago: it failed to move on. Too much in love with the past that it didn’t care about its present and future. Much of the world is in 2010, we are still stuck in the 60s.

    [Reply]

  • The Filipino wrote on 23 November, 2010, 7:58

    I agree with the general sentiments of this article. However, I do have one caveat: I think the idea that one can peel off all the layers that make a Filipino a Filipino without one’s losing his Filipino-ness is an argument taken too far. I am hoping the author’s last sentence is not the ONLY thing that makes him Filipino because my saying “I have a desire to see Africa improve” does not make me an African. Of course, Filipino cultural traits, when stupidly applied, is just plain stupid; but per se, I don’t think there’s anything absolutely wrong with the Filipino culture. In fact, I think it is even responsible for making the Filipinos in the US, as a group, more successful than other groups, even counting the dominant whites (as shown by a perusal of the US Census data). There’s a lot of good to be said about “po” and “opo”; about “pakikisama”; about “hiya”; about “pride” in a kabayan’s accomplishments; etc.
    I do believe the application of these traits have to evolve and mature to make it more compelling and be a source of gain for Philippine society, not pain. (As an aside, check out this article by an “Ask” blogger about one’s identity: http://askakorean.blogspot.com/2008/06/what-makes-person-korean.html. For full disclosure, The Filipino got his inspiration for his blog from The Korean and The Mexican, both of whom have been very supportive of him.)

    [Reply]

    ChinoF

    ChinoF Reply:

    “I think it is even responsible for making the Filipinos in the US, as a group, more successful than other groups…”

    I believe this article will show one example of how Filipino culture negatively affects Filipinos in the US:
    Why are young Fil-Ams doing poorly in school?

    [Reply]

    The Filipino Reply:

    Frankly, I don’t trust that “NaFFAA study.” From my personal readings, personal observations, anecdotal evidence, teachers I talk to — it is just complete BS that “In Los Angeles, the dropout numbers for Filipino-American students represented 56 percent of all dropouts in the county.” I strongly believe the reality is Hispanics account for an overwhelming majority! Now, it is probable that that “56%” means 56% of all Asians — I’ll concede that’s possible. Where I live, in generally upper middle-class and the more affluent suburbs, Filipinos rock and are just as ambitious and driven as the Koreans and the Chinese and the Japanese (and definitely not the hiphop types portrayed in that “NaFFAA study”)! But don’t take my word for it. See this US Census report: http://www.census.gov/prod/2007pubs/acs-05.pdf, then go look at pages 15 and 17. Educational attainment of Filipinos: 90.8% of Filipinos are high school grads and almost 50% have bachelors’ degrees. Filipinos also have a median household income of about $65,700 (which I thought was sort of low), but it’s second only to the Indians (from India). In any case, what is my point? The “Filipino culture,” when transplanted in a different environment with functional systems and strong rule of law, is not a hindrance to success, even if I admit that it is so in the Philippine environment. The prominent journalist and author, James Fallows, who wrote “A Damaged Culture” in 1987 which is about the Philippines, has observed the same thing. Bottomline: In making your point (and I agree you do have a strong point from which everyone can see some grain of truth), you really don’t need to be too harsh on all of us Pinoys. But then again, if that’s your shtick, so be it.

    [Reply]

    ChinoF

    ChinoF Reply:

    All I’m harsh on is the bad parts of Filipino culture itself, and not Filipino culture itself, at least that’s how I see it. But I will agree on having the good aspects mature; I believe we have not reached that maturity of culture yet, which we can see in our Wowowee population.

    Sharafa Reply:

    “(Faux) Patriotism is the last refuge of a scoundrel.”

    The way I see it, anyone who serves for the betterment of the country can be considered a Filipino. As for cultural traits, they are as manmade as our infrastructures and therefore can be created and destroyed. It’s only our willingness (or lack of) that prevents this.

    [Reply]

    ChinoF

    ChinoF Reply:

    I like the saying you quoted and your explanation on cultural traits. Excellent points.

    [Reply]

    Jay Reply:

    Good one Sharafa! Our culture is man made and like Rome, can be destroyed and rebuilt as we please. Sure it won’t take a day but without any effort, nothing man made would ever be realized.

    My friend said there are no stupid people, just lazy people. They can stay ignorant but they know the basis for the truth inside their heads.

    [Reply]

    ChinoF

    ChinoF Reply:

    “My friend said there are no stupid people, just lazy people.”

    Hey, I should quote this in my “stupid” article.

  • PB_KSA wrote on 23 November, 2010, 9:07

    Oh, some just can’t make head or tail of this article. And the truth sure hurt some in here, did it nitesoul ??? I advise you to grow up and face reality!

    [Reply]

  • brianitus wrote on 23 November, 2010, 9:37

    Taga-QC ka nga pala. Kain tayo ng isaw sa Diliman, Chino.

    Sabi nga ni Homer Simpson, “Celebrate your commonality. Some of us don’t eat pork, some of us don’t eat shellfish, but all of us love chicken.”

    [Reply]

    ChinoF

    ChinoF Reply:

    Kinda busy these days, but yeah, we gotta get together some time.

    [Reply]

  • Chorvaqueen wrote on 23 November, 2010, 11:18

    LOL, it just so happens that I’m so inclined on the English language that I can’t help it but to just use it casually. It’s annoying when they think I’m a foreigner. :|

    But it’s annoying, whenever I get with a decent argument about this country, they attack my English saying I’m a hypocrite, unpatriotic and ungrateful—ergo, no right to talk about the country and putting up any argument.

    [Reply]

    Maki_Alam Reply:

    “But it’s annoying, whenever I get with a decent argument about this country, they attack my English saying I’m a hypocrite, unpatriotic and ungrateful—ergo, no right to talk about the country and putting up any argument.”

    Chorvaqueen, say hello to the typical proud Pinoy. :D That’s what they always say when criticized, and ESPECIALLY when criticized in English.

    [Reply]

    Maki_Alam Reply:

    Oh yeah, they also say:

    “mayabang”
    “pretentious”
    “intelektwal kuno pero sa totoo lang kayo ang bobo”
    “basta kami proud, bitter lang kayo”
    “hindi kayo Pilipino, pumunta na lang kayo sa Amerika”…

    Did I miss anything?

    [Reply]

    Birdigator Reply:

    You missed something along the lines of:

    “Mayaman kayo / Hindi nyo alam ang hirap ng mga Pinoy, so we don’t care what you say”

    “Salita kayo ng salita, ano ba nagawa ninyo para sa Pinas aside from putting her down?”

    or simply dismissed as

    “Wag ka mag generalise”

    “Ganyan na ang sistema, wala tayo magagawa”

    Jay Reply:

    hypocrite, unpatriotic and ungrateful

    Its simple, you love the country so much more that you are willing to go and find the truths to help make it better. Even if it meant changing the worlds and possibly changing EVERYTHING that they believe and love, forever. Even if it meant exposing Oligarchs, the saints and the queen/kings they have crowned.

    Their notions for the country are selfish if anything.

    [Reply]

  • Hyden Toro wrote on 23 November, 2010, 12:17

    There is a good saying that states: “You cannot jump out, of your own skin.”
    Whatever you prefer to do for yourself in life; it is your choice. It will never make you less of what you are…Those people trying to impose to everybody their Yellow Horde Mentality. Are minions of the imbecile President Noynoy Aquino. They want you to wear Yellow Shirt. Flash a “L” laban sign. And sing “Bayan Ko”. They want you to speak Tagalog only. Because, they cannot express themselves in any other language.

    [Reply]

  • Maki_Alam wrote on 23 November, 2010, 12:28

    I’ve also been wondering, if Pinoys are so proud of their ‘race’, why do they keep using whitening products?

    [Reply]

    ChinoF

    ChinoF Reply:

    In Wikipedia’s article on Colonial Mentality (which oddly focuses a lot on the Philippines), this mentality is not a cause of the desire for whitening products. It’s just advertising and consumerism, and perhaps the recent health and wellness craze. Perhaps you could attribute it to MLMs, too.

    [Reply]

    Maki_Alam Reply:

    I see. I guess it all boils down to the media–again–doing what they do best–>brainwashing the masses.

    [Reply]

  • ulong pare
    ulong pare wrote on 23 November, 2010, 15:49

    daaaaaang!…. i was born in flipland of good looking conyo parents… raised in sevilla espana, napoli, italia, suffolk uk, perth nsw australia, honshu yokosuka-yo japan, navarete, republica dominica, etc., etc… all ovah ‘merka, and last but not least malagu-laguna which is my peyborit place… i am 99% flip, 1% jackass… and proud to be a filipino… and for those of you who despise your own skin, allah eh… magbigti ka na lang sa puno ng aratiles… bwi hi hi hi hi, mga gung gong… estupido!

    [Reply]

  • The Filipino wrote on 23 November, 2010, 16:32

    ChinoF: Sad to say, you are right about the fact that our culture needs some serious upgrading, especially with regards to the “Wowowee population.” I must admit, elitist though it may sound, my sense of Filipino identity felt cheapened and sickened by the show, that is why I absolutely banned it from being shown in my house (except of course I still got to watch it when eating in Filipino restaurants or in some of my friends’ houses). And that “population” you mentioned is actually large: It included the pitiful poor contestants who groveled at the feet of the show’s goods; the vapid-looking (though sexy) dancers who chucked whatever remained of their dignity; the producers who took advantage of the dancers and the contestants; the audience who found the whole thing amusing; the occasional guests who sucked up to the hosts to sell themselves and their wares; the advertisers and ABS-CBN management who profited immensely from the show; the Filipino balikbayans who waived their dollars/euros/dinars/etc. in order to show off; and the most disgusting piece of showbiz scum in the whole wide world, Willie Revillame. (This is why when asked about musical artists, I said I hate Willie — see http://askthepinoy.blogspot.com/2010/11/who-are-best-filipino-musical-artists.html).

    [Reply]

    ChinoF

    ChinoF Reply:

    It sure looks like a long way to go to fix the problems of our culture. Mass media is a large obstacle to this. But Internet is helping provide the tools for scattering awareness, and later coordinating efforts to bring the media giants to bay.

    [Reply]

  • Angel wrote on 23 November, 2010, 21:01

    I think therefore..I am not Filipino? XDD Ganun ata pinapalabas ng iba dyan eh…:P

    [Reply]

    ChinoF

    ChinoF Reply:

    Haha, actually, that “I think” slogan is the Wowowee population’s belief. Everyone else you see commenting is flabbergasted by a myth sadly so embraced by a large part of the populace.

    [Reply]

  • outoftheblue wrote on 23 November, 2010, 21:23

    I like the ending note

    “So what makes me Filipino? My desire to see my country’s system fixed, and my country’s culture transformed into one that is more respectable”

    I like your being independent. You have a great grip of your individuality and you do not succumb to what the media feeds.

    I too, hate the attitude of the Wowowee population. So cheap. Imagine making a fool out of yourself just to get money?

    I do watch TV but I am very selective with the programs. I watch “Story Line” on ANC. I like the way the guests narrate their stories. The direction is more on what they want to say and less than what the media wants to show. I’ve seen several success stories in Story Line and I hope that our kababayans learn something from such examples. They can make a living through perseverance and hard work, not just relying on the government and TV shows such as Wowowee.

    I have relatives who marvel at variety shows like ASAP. I pity actors who are forced to dance and sing, not because they want to but because they signed for it. This is only an example of how the networks milk their talents out. In the US, I like how they manage talents. Actors remain actors. Models remain models. Recording artists who are capable films sometimes though. Imagine Brad Pitt signing and dancing like Piolo Pascual does in ASAP?

    To me as well, being Filipino is not about lifestyle. It’s about our love for the country. In my level, as an ordinary citizen, I can do so little. I do hope that somehow, these little contributions go a long way.

    [Reply]

    Maki_Alam Reply:

    “I too, hate the attitude of the Wowowee population. So cheap. Imagine making a fool out of yourself just to get money?”

    And this is supposed to be the so-called proud Pinoy. Go figure.

    “To me as well, being Filipino is not about lifestyle. It’s about our love for the country. In my level, as an ordinary citizen, I can do so little. I do hope that somehow, these little contributions go a long way.”

    Oh, but they do. Keep doing those little things. If we all did, it would add up and certainly make a world of difference. :)

    [Reply]

    MKDL Studios Reply:

    Very reasonable, sir, regarding the part you mentioned ASAP. it’s a pity that the Philippine cinema industry is already in a decaying state, save for the impressive independent but Gawad Urian Award-winning productions like those of Brillante Mendoza.

    [Reply]

    Jay Reply:

    It is a bad, reinforced habit that one thinks that to be Filipino, you have to be some part of other ethnic group (pampageno, batangueno, bulacan, wtfever churva) or makisama with the failed cultural aspects of the country.

    In any relationship, one shows concern for something and finds it out to confront it with the other person, not because they want to expose them, but because they care about them so much that they went all the way out to show concern. That is love. The same kind of love parents show to kids and friends show to their own when they move away from them with some uncertainty. Not the propagated bull**** that the media enforces. They selectively care because they know who to pick and choose to represent pinoys to the failed values.

    But if you really cared, you would continually make that relationship work, even if they are sick and tired of hearing all the bad things they keep doing to help ruin the relationship. And if pinoys loved their country, they would do best to get back into the relationship and listen, instead of being deluded. The little things can become big things but hopefully, you want them to appeal to helping do the big things to get into ideas that help change worlds.

    And I love my country and where I am born from. I love it so much I’m willing to withstand every dumb ass telling me I’m wrong while I slowly convince them to shape up, or see the country I love fall into ruins.

    [Reply]

  • Renato Pacifico wrote on 24 November, 2010, 15:05

    I am Filipino by looks but not in action, in words and in deeds …

    [Reply]

  • Renato Pacifico wrote on 24 November, 2010, 15:07

    So is Obama an American? Or, Indonesianese? Or, Ethiopianese ? How does American looks like? A Filipino born in America is an American or a Filipino? Is a Filipino born in the Netherlands a Neanderthal or a Filipino? Then why do Filipinos hate me when I tell them I am not a Filipino?

    [Reply]

  • Renato Pacifico wrote on 24 November, 2010, 15:09

    I speak faulty englischtzes, unlike Filipinos. I am a poor speller, unlike Filipinos. I don’t speakengese goot englischtzes, unlike Filipinos. I follow traffic rules, unlike Filipinos. I pay my undoctored taxes, unlike Filipinos. I do not disturb my neighbours clapping and screaming on Pacquiao’s fight, unlike Filipinos. TO MAKE IT SHORT, I AM NOT WHAT FILIPINOS ARE!!!!

    [Reply]

  • Renato Pacifico wrote on 24 November, 2010, 15:12

    I survive democratic, communist, parliamentary, theocratic countries, LIKE ALL FILIPINOS ABROAD!!! WHY IN THE WORLD WE NEED DESIGNER CONSTITUTION AND DESIGNER GOVERNMENT FOR EVERY SITTING PRESIDENT ??? Why do we need to change the government and constitution every 6 years for the new President???? WHY O WHY, GALING FILIPINOS. PLEASE ANSWER ME!!!!!

    [Reply]

    Hyden Toro Reply:

    ” The answer, my friend is: blowing in the wind…the answer: is blowing in the wind.”, wrote the songwriter/activist and singer: Bob Dylan of the U.S…

    [Reply]

    WritingForJuan Reply:

    “WHY IN THE WORLD WE NEED DESIGNER CONSTITUTION AND DESIGNER GOVERNMENT FOR EVERY SITTING PRESIDENT ??? Why do we need to change the government and constitution every 6 years for the new President????”

    the government is made for the people, not the people made for the government. therefore, the government must conform to the needs of the people.

    [Reply]

  • Renato Pacifico wrote on 24 November, 2010, 15:16

    I do not watch TFC channel, unlike Filipinos. I do not use computer to Friendster and Facebook, unlike Filipinos. I love veggies, yogurt. I drink bottled water not tap water, unlike Filipinos. I do not eat lechon, dinugo-an, crispy pata, and other CORONARY FOODS, unlike Filipinos … THEREFORE, I AM NOT A FILIPINO …. I do not watch Manny Pacquiao, Charice Pempenco nor listen to ARnel Pineda. I listen aaron copland, anne sofie Van otter Antonio Vivalde, Bach, Cecilia Bartoli Handel Joshua bell edgar meyer mussorgsky … I MUST NOT BE A FILIPINO!!!!

    [Reply]

    ChinoF

    ChinoF Reply:

    But that’s not what I’m saying. ;)

    [Reply]

  • JUANDELACRUZ wrote on 25 November, 2010, 5:32

    Yes, you are truly Filipino indeed, DAHIL NAGBUBUHAT KA NA NGA NG SARILI MONG BANGKO , NAPAKAINGAY MO PA EH. This site is genuinely Filipino DAHIL PURO COLONIAL-MENTALITY AT CRAB-MENTALITY ANG LAMAN NG MGA ARTIKULO DITO. And I am really Filipino because in my daily life I practice the Filipino Ideal: KAPAG MAY GUSTO, MAY PARAAN, KAPAG MAY AYAW, MAY DAHILAN. Hahahahahahahahaha! MABUHAY ANG PILIPINAS! MABUHAY TAYONG LAHAT! Hahahahahahahahaha! :D

    [Reply]

    Birdigator Reply:

    Juandelacruz,

    But that’s the purpose of this website, if you’ve read the About page(http://antipinoy.com/hello-world/). I think that so far, from the articles that I’ve read, it’s still within the scope. This website attempts to bring the ‘bad qualities’ of the culture, behaviour and government to the fore, while sometimes proposing solutions that have worked in other countries.

    If you want the good news, as they say, there’s www.goodnewspilipinas.com/ you can go visit and try to forget and sweep under the rug all the rubbish in this country.

    Regards!

    [Reply]

    AlvinEternal Reply:

    Sorry, but I’m Filipino as a citizen and not part of our flawed culture. This article speaks the truth.

    A Filipino who loves the Lord God and not someone who is “religious.”

    [Reply]

  • Alma wrote on 25 November, 2010, 8:17

    my impression is that you are an independent person and have a critical mind… sana marami pang mga pilipino na nagiisip katulad mo…

    [Reply]

    ChinoF

    ChinoF Reply:

    I’m glad you share my wish, Alma.

    [Reply]

    Aegis-Judex Reply:

    More’s the pity in this country.

    [Reply]

  • Aj wrote on 25 November, 2010, 9:21

    Television is democracy at it’s ugliest.

    [Reply]

    ChinoF

    ChinoF Reply:

    Especially in this country, I agree.

    [Reply]

  • concerned_citizen wrote on 26 November, 2010, 7:31

    People still can’t face the facts. Reality is smacking them in the face each day and they still refuse to acknowledge it. If Filipinos ever learn, then it might probably too late. The truth is that, “We never learn!”

    [Reply]

    Renato Pacifico Reply:

    Concerned_citizen, Filipinos has learning disability. It is etched in their genes. They are programmed to be degenerate and speak goot englischtzes adoringly like it is holy.

    [Reply]

  • F.G. wrote on 26 November, 2010, 8:08

    I can relate to this article in so many ways. When ever I go back to the Philippines, I can’t help but to be mad, and sad. I finished elementary in Bulacan, and let me tell ya, I hated it. I was made fun of because I couldn’t speak tagalog, and I act too “western” (I was born in Manila, but went to the US at 7 years old, but when my mom died from cancer, I had to stay there for a while). Anywho, I find it hypocritical, since my classmates would listen to English songs, dress up western, heck even try to out english each other. They even made fun my dead mother.

    I’m not ashame to be Filipino. I love my country. But I despites my fellow countrymen who don’t practice what they preach, who keep running around how proud they are and all that non-sense. Action speaks louder than words, and Filpinos need to take action.

    Growing up, I always ask myself “What is it to be proud about being Filipino?” and “How can we make Philippines better?” Here is my answer:

    1.) All the rich Filipinos or those who have big incomes that they saved over they years, outside of the Philippines, should all go home, open businesses, give jobs.

    2.) Filipinos who are poor: QUIT MAKING BABIES. IF YOU ARE FINANCIALLY INCAPABLE OF HAVING A KID, KEEP YOUR PANTS ZIPPED AND YOUR LEGS CLOSED.

    3.) Filipinos need to stop being delusional and stop making excuses why Philippines is in a depressing state.

    What makes me proud about being Filipino are my ancestors who fought against the bulls*it that was happening there. THOSES WHO WERE SO PROUD, WILLING TO DO ANYTHING, EVEN IF IT’S THE COST OF THEY’RE LIVES. This is what most Filipinos lack nowadays. Sacrifice. We let evil policians push us around and at the same time, run away from our problems back home.

    I’m not gonna be like the other Filipinos “work in abroad and never come back”. My dad is planning to retire soon in Philippines around 2014, and he wants to open a business back home. Despite our different opinions about Filipinos, (My dad is the Optimistic Filipino, who sometimes can’t accept critizism of Philippines, while I’m not delusional) But one thing is for sure we both have the same dream: We want to help our beautiful, yet depressing country.

    I want to become an Animator, and someday open an Animation studio back home. I want to encourage not just young Filipino kids, but also inspire adults as well, to love our country.

    This is all I can say.

    [Reply]

    ChinoF

    ChinoF Reply:

    I admire your desire to come back and help out. One barrier to business though is the local oligarchs. They own local businesses and utilities, especially electricity, and this chokes many businesses with high costs. If only these problems were solved, it would be much easier for you to set up a business here.

    [Reply]

    Renato Pacifico Reply:

    HA!HA!HA! On your #1, All those rich Filipinos abroad when they come back they must become corrupt first so their business permit can be approved in a week. If not, they will die waiting for the business permit.

    On your #2, Filipinos cannot quit making babies. God says “Go out and multiply”. You cannot beat religion.

    On your #3, I have made attacking Philippines and Filipinos as entertainment, like WoWoWieee, in which Willie makes the miseries of his audience an entertainment of others.

    OFWs will never come back. Because OFWs are looked down as nothing but hugas-pfwet, houseslaves, japayukis, uneducated, unemployables. So, they’d rather be living abroad where a houseslave has dignity of labor.

    Lookit, there is no hope in the Philippines. The lesser their hopes the better for my FOREX! Magkano na ba ang forex? HA!HA!HA!HA!

    [Reply]

    F.G. Reply:

    Renato Pacifico: STFU :D Instead of ranting, make yourself useful or just **** off. At least MY FAMILY is standing up for what we believe in instead of just sitting around. ChinoF: Don’t worry, my dad has TONS of money, over the years of hard work, and my aunt from Dubai is plannng to go home soon too, either open a Bakery or Pharmacy, AND my grandfather from Philippines already has a business in Davao City.

    [Reply]

    Renato Pacifico Reply:

    Oh, yeah, FG. I am making myself useful. Others offer solution. My tactic is prevention and pre-emption by exposing weird culture of Filipinos. WHAT GOOT IS A SOLUTION IF FILIPINOS BELIEVE MANNY PACQUIAO, ARNEL PINEDA AND CHARICE ARE BLESSINGS FROM GOD? HA!H@HA!HA!HA!
    What goot is a solution if having a Visa is a mana from God?
    What goot is a solution if 99.99% of Filipinos are corrupt?
    What goot is a solution if Filipinos cannot accept the reality of Filipino gung-gongness?

  • ivan labayne wrote on 27 November, 2010, 6:05

    this is your conclusion:
    So what makes me Filipino? My desire to see my country’s system fixed, and my country’s culture transformed into one that is more respectable.
    the problem i am seeing is that we tend to rant about things, expressing our thoughts about certain issues. well, i respect YOUR thoughts but I still want to have my say here.
    More than anything else, what this country needs is ACTION. this action must germinate from a deep analysis of the situation of our country. We must trace the roots of all these problems we are seeing and ranting about now. we must not stop in identifying and qualifying the “ugliness” of our situations. We must be able to challenge ourselves, try to fathom the causes of this ugly situation and ponder upon the things that can really solve the problem.

    before we subjectively react on certain issues, we must have already objectively looked at these issues; that is, understanding the phenomenon and its implcactions to our everyday lives and the collective experience of OUR country.

    [Reply]

  • ivan labayne wrote on 27 November, 2010, 6:13

    moreover, you are speaking in very general, and thus, vague terms. You said you want to see the “country’s system fixed” without exactly qualifying the kind of system that ours have. Why should our system be fixed, what is exactly wrong with it? You failed to shed light on this as you phrased these words hastily i guess.
    you also said, “to transform our culture into a more respectable” one. Again, what makes up our culture right now? Why it needs to gain the sense of respectability, what makes it unrespectable now?
    the dangers of language is when it is not maximized and when we thoughtlessly use “big” terms without clarifying the meaning we are trying to convey. what will you do to “transform” that culture. Language is too abstract msot of the times, i guess, and we cannot achieve something significant by relying on rhetorics

    [Reply]

    ChinoF

    ChinoF Reply:

    You are right that we need action. But as I have stated in other articles, the problems are multifaceted. We have a poor government system, corrupt media and misguided culture, to cite some of them. The solutions I support for each would be charter change, support of alternative media and encouragement of counterculture.

    Also, instead of commenting on my language, you might want to give your own suggestions for the problems I’ve mentioned. My language is meant for the layman. I’m not transfixed on scholarly perspectives. Here I have stated concrete examples of how one can still be Filipino despite being different from the most popular traits associated with it.

    [Reply]

    ivan labayne Reply:

    okay, i got it.
    i want to comment on the solutions you support: (1) charter change, (2) support of alternative media and (3) counterculture.
    First, about charter change, do you completely understand the provisions stated in the new charter and their would-be implications once it is approved and executed? The thing that frightens me most regarding that charter change is its economic provisions, most specifically, its (ultra) encouragement of foreign investments that actually implicitly spell foreign control over our country. Once the Charter change is approved, foreign entities can freely invest in our country, set up their large businesses here, make use of our land for their profit. Issues of taxation and even environmental issues must enter here. The entry of these foreign companies in our country does not necessarily mean that they will likewise be responsible of generating jobs for our people and boosting our national economy.
    yes, jobs will be generated but they will be placed under unjust contracts, i.e. contractualization of workers and minimal pay (considering the amount of work they will have to do and the amount of profit the workers can give to the company). so in that note, I oppose charter change.
    alternative media is again vague. From where will we launch this alternative media, what will be their orientation, their framework? I believe that you are coming from the position that the current media is so deceptive, illusionary, too sensational etcetera but your proposition for an “alternative” media is so hazy that it comes also ineffectually.

    counterculture is also a good point. The culture of our people, the way we perceive our circumstances, our experiences have been highly influenced by the “deceptive images” that surround us(the movies, soap operas, pop songs, even pop books). We need to replace these culture (hence, the need for a counter-culture) and like an “alternative media,” this counter-culture should also spring from a self-conscious knowledge of our present conditions and a good understanding of the factors that bring about this ugly, unjust, whatever-negative-word-that-fits situation we are all in right now.

    Only after understanding the interplay of factors (economic, political and social) that buttress the current order can we launch a concerted, programmatic action that will address the problems from their root causes.

    [Reply]

    ChinoF

    ChinoF Reply:

    I only hope you’re not saying, “don’t make a move until we understand everything,” since that might spell inaction. Total stop. Because we won’t really be able to understand everything, realistically. But I believe we understand enough to proceed with these points I’ve iterated.

    Who’s afraid of foreign control our our country if they can run it better than we do? ;)

    ivan labayne Reply:

    okay, that last point you said looked problematic to me.
    How were you able to infer that foreign entities can run our country better? By bombarding our country with products like NIke, Mcdo chains, Acer laptops or Hollywood films? I do not want to appear like I am against these cultural products per se. Inherently, there is nothing wrong with them. The problem lies in the fact that they are products utilized in favor of the foreign interest, not us. They hail us as “consumerist: subjects, and while we end up idolizing these products (which are also symbols), we spend money just to have them, and in the process, spelling economic gain to their foreign producers.
    our relationship with foreigners is a complex one, and I believe we have to rethink seriously about these relations. Because if we don’t, I think we will just continue being hapless, and helpless Westernized objects subtly controlled by, well, the west, (America, more specifically).

    ChinoF

    ChinoF Reply:

    It is problematic, so I still agree that to push for learning how to run our culture and country properly on our own is better.

    Jay Reply:

    @

    How were you able to infer that foreign entities can run our country better? By bombarding our country with products like NIke, Mcdo chains, Acer laptops or Hollywood films?

    Implying that the current monopoly of the oligarchs aren’t keen in trying to retake the market that is already flooded with cheap, pirated chinese goods. We idolize the products as it is anyway but the problem is the Pinoys still don’t get the gravity of the situation they have. Why buy pinoy made when it is half arse and costs much more when the Chinese manufactured equivalent is cheaper and more durable?

    The local monopoly doesn’t promote competition. Without competition, you get a business presence for a most part that doesn’t believe in the concept of customer service. Competition not only makes the world go round, but it promotes better products and services. Of course the main issue is what if the Pinoy oligarch backed companies buckle under the foreign ones? Their loss. Which makes it even more of a point for any pinoy based company to be smarter, faster and ultimately better in order to survive. I mean, you don’t think that after the playing field is leveled that only the oligarchs are willing to throw money around right?

    The biggest benefit as well is are more jobs being opened up, giving more opportunities for those who a college education to climb under a foreigner’s vision and grow, as opposed to the complacent pinoy corporations who haven’t diversified and grown themselves.

    The Philippines are in a precarious yet always interesting situation, influenced by many and are close trade partners with a REAL economic tiger as well as influence with a GDP powerhouse. If the country and its people don’t act and test their determination with some real risks worth trying, then what you say about the country will ALWAYS be hapless. And spineless and soft hearted.

  • pandoism wrote on 27 November, 2010, 21:50

    “I’m keep on posting these wake up and life changing articles to my dear friends even they don’t have the time to read, ignore these concepts and sometimes reply with stupid and raging comments, I’m still Filipino.”

    Thats what I have posted in our school’s unofficial forums just to add ChinoF’s list. Right now, I have healthy comments and discussions in my thread. I hope I have just started a revolution to change our erratic society.

    [Reply]

  • ricky rosario wrote on 29 November, 2010, 3:08

    pain full of pain why can’t just we live our lives and just be contented with what we have and what we pull is what we reap.

    [Reply]

  • jankev wrote on 1 December, 2010, 7:02

    Imagine a Philippines having an exact copy of the American culture(or Singapore or Indonesia). I don’t think there would be anything we could call Filipino about ourselves at all. Well, except maybe on how we look, yes? The very important part of being Filipino is our culture. It’s what separates us from the others. Our culture is our identity. Yes, there’s a lot about our culture that we’re not proud of and need to change but we can’t just totally trash it like that and still say “I’m a Filipino”.

    You tried to prove yourself as a Filipino by having this “desire to fix… blah blah blah”. There are actually some foreigners who share this very same desire but can you really say it makes them Filipino? I think not. An another thing, desires or intentions have no merit. It’s not your intention, but it’s your action that defines you. You’ve never mentioned anything concrete you’ve done for your country. Your claim of being a Filipino is pathetic. Sorry but you’re no Filipino to me.

    [Reply]

    ChinoF

    ChinoF Reply:

    Well, that’s your opinion.

    “It’s not your intention, but it’s your action that defines you.” I will agree with this. But adhering to the trappings of culture isn’t really an action that will bring up a nation.

    “You’ve never mentioned anything concrete you’ve done for your country.” Check my description under my article. Have I not brought us on the map for being part of something? ;) Of course, I will claim that blogging here is something concrete.

    [Reply]

    dumb-oh Reply:

    last 2 statements sounds like MAKISAMA KA to me. Hahahaha.

    [Reply]

    ChinoF

    ChinoF Reply:

    “Imagine a Philippines having an exact copy of the American culture(or Singapore or Indonesia)”

    Let me recall my Asian history: Japan during the Yamato period or during its first empire decided to copy the culture of Tang Dynasty China (for example, notice how the kimonos are similar to Chinese robes worn in Buddha’s Magic Palm and similar kung-fu shows). Yet the Japanese still called themselves Japanese, not Chinese. After the Americans came, the Japanese decided to accept western uniforms and apparel, and still called themselves Japanese.

    But I think we Filipinos already are a copy of American culture in many ways.

    [Reply]

  • nada wrote on 4 December, 2010, 6:26

    While on the American’s point of view:

    I agree with the US Air Force’s A330 decision over the 767 for their aircraft tanker replacement program even if the aircraft parts are made in Europe because it fits their needs especially its efficiency. So what? I’m still American.

    [Reply]

    nada Reply:

    I refer about the US congress and senate patriotic idiots who are against Northrop Grumman’s outsourced A330 tanker by EADS only because it’s un-American. Socialism selfishness at it’s best.

    [Reply]

    ChinoF

    ChinoF Reply:

    Interesting one too! I believe America is actually the culture we imitate when we say “Proud to be Pinoy,” which seems to mimic American patriotism styles. So if they get a better quality product with Airbus than their own Boeing, why not? I recall Airbus accusing Boeing of being government-funded, which is cheating.

    [Reply]

  • bryangld27 wrote on 5 December, 2010, 1:26

    I thank you for writing this article. I have a hard time expressing myself and this is exactly how I feel towards our defective culture.

    I was really unhappy when I was in the Philippines because of the concept of ‘pakikisama’. I had to sacrifice my integrity and personal preferences in order to fit in. In the Philippines, you really do have to do what everyone does in order to fit in. If they say, today’s fashion trend is slippers and jeans! When you go out, 3/4s of the people will be wearing slippers and jeans.

    I am thankful to God for giving me the chance to move into Australia at the age of 16. I love how I can grow long hair without being talked upon, I love how the whole class doesn’t laugh just because this popular person said a joke, I love how people don’t talk about every move I make, I love how I can wear different clothes when I go outside without people staring at me and mostly, I love being able to express myself with having people say NGE or WAG KANA or ULOL T*NGINA MO.

    I believe this article would smash a typical Filipino’s pride and get him/her to wake up.

    PS: Regarding the pakikisama thing, I hate when Filipinos tell me,”You don’t like basketball and you like soccer yet you call yourself a Filipino??? The next time I get told that, Imma say, Yeah I love soccer so by your logic I guess that makes me a Brazilian :P

    [Reply]

    dumb-oh Reply:

    I wish I was as lucky as you are.

    Wait till they label me as a traitor for agreeing with you. Har har har.

    [Reply]

    ChinoF

    ChinoF Reply:

    I’m glad to help you feel that you’re not alone. If you felt more freedom in Australia than the Philippines, that certainly is a sad sign. I feel that there is cultural gestapoism in this country that prevents us from asserting our individuality and improve our culture on our own. It’s always, “just follow, don’t disobey.” I’m hoping to break down this obstacle to help our culture move forward. Thanks.

    I’m a traitor too for agreeing with Bryangld27. :P

    [Reply]

    Birdigator Reply:

    Hey Australia was a British colony! So were Malaysia, Singapore, Hong Kong and New Zealand!

    But that’s all history now. It’s not like we can visit London and ask their Parliament to teach us how to run a country. I must be a traitor for even thinking such a thing!

    I’m thankful for being raised in a British household(my Dad was Brit), so I don’t really care for Flip culture. All I have to say is “Who’s doing better?” I do my best to influence my own, new family with the same Brit rules that were drilled into me, though I must admit it’s not easy considering my wife is from a purebred Flip family.

    [Reply]

  • Great Ma wrote on 10 December, 2010, 0:05

    NITESOUL IS A ****ING TANGALOG!!!

    [Reply]

  • ReikaLee wrote on 11 December, 2010, 7:29

    I’d like to add my own too:

    I’m not offended and I even laugh at racist Filipino jokes, I’m not warm and hospitable to guests and I don’t bring nor expect pasalubong. So what? I’m still Filipino.

    [Reply]

  • Maki_Alam wrote on 11 December, 2010, 16:26

    In the sitcom ‘The Big Bang Theory’, there is an Indian character there and the other characters are always poking fun at his accent and his Indian-ness. Even the Indian does it, too. So what? He’s still Indian. I love how they can make jokes like that, not because they’re racist, but because ‘race’ just isn’t a big deal. I imagine if the character was a Filipino, we would have filed a diplomatic protest long ago and demanded an apology from the show’s creators, or the show would have been instantly banned here. Filipinos take this concept of ‘race’ way too seriously and are easily offended. They really need to learn how to differentiate between harmless ribbing and real ‘racism’ like hate crimes and discrimination.

    I can poke fun at my own Filipino-ness. So what? I’m still Filipino.

    [Reply]

  • ReikaLee wrote on 11 December, 2010, 22:31

    Wow! I’m glad to hear India takes it all so well. Also the Arabs, Chinese, Koreans, Mexicans and Russians have been portrayed negatively so many times in Hollywood films yet they never raised fists against the USA nor did they bitch about racism.

    I’m sure you’ve watched Word of the Lourd and his video entitled “Balat Sibuyas.” Also ever mentioned that Vietnam didn’t go rabid when Mai Mislang insulted them nor did Mexico demand an apology when a local reporter joked about having a Pacquiao monument at the USA-Mexico border to scare illegal immigrants off?

    [Reply]

    Maki_Alam Reply:

    Yeah, that’s another thing I don’t like about most Filipinos. They can make ‘racist’ comments like that without a second thought, but once other nationalities do it to us, we raise hell and demand apologies left and right. Magaling mang-alaska, pero pikon naman pag sya ang inalaska.

    [Reply]

    ChinoF

    ChinoF Reply:

    It can be because of the erroneous belief and sentiment that the Filipino is the “api” of the world, thus making Filipinos demand that other countries “lay off the poor guy.”

    Thanks, Reika, for your comments, I appreciate the support for some of my opinions.

    [Reply]

    Maki_Alam Reply:

    I wonder why, though? Where did this ‘api’ concept come from? Is this uniquely Filipino?

    Our third-world status and colonial past may have something to do with it, but we’re not the only developing country in the world that was also once a colony.

    The Catholic Church is also to blame. Them and their “blessed are the poor and the meek shall inherit the earth (while we take their land and demand tithes)” teachings. But again, we’re not the only Catholic country in the world either.

    And then we also have the local media, telenovelas and game shows that glorify the downtrodden. Again, is this uniquely Filipino? I’m not sure.

    I guess all these factors came together to form the Frankenstein monster that is the Pinoy ‘api’ mentality. But a nation like Mexico shares many (if not all) of these traits with us–also a developing country, also a former Spanish colony, also Catholic, and loves telenovelas, too. Yet they’re not as onion-skinned as we are. Why? Why is the Pinoy so balat-sibuyas??? It’s especially baffling, considering this ‘api’ mentality often goes hand in hand with our ‘we are da best’ mentality. Self-pity and arrogance rolled into one. Onli in da Pilipins!

  • ReikaLee wrote on 13 December, 2010, 1:23

    @

    On the other hand it is I who should be thanking you and all of the members of Anti-Pinoy, It makes me glad there are Filipinos brave enough to write about the flaws of their own country even under the risk of receiving tons of hate mail from rabid FAILipinos.

    @
    We share the same sentiments of blaming the Catholic Church of this “poor” mentality. I also hate that just because the Church says to give to the poor doesn’t automatically mean it’s the obligation of the more financially gifted to provide for them. My biggest pet peeves are beggars and solicitors who say, “Ang dadamot niyo naman! Wala na kayong awa!” or “Kaawaan ka ng Diyos,” whenever I refuse to give alms.

    I blame the media as well. Our communications prof said it’s one of the reasons why many Filipinos remain impoverished. Our local teleseryes often portray good guys to be poor and simple-minded but with a heart of gold and bad guys to be rich, intelligent and just plain evil. This led the masa to think they’re the “bida” of Philippine society in general. Just look at MariMar, Agua Bendita and numerous other underdog protagonists. Di na baleng tatanga-tanga basta mabait at laging nagpe-pray kay Papa Jesus.

    [Reply]

  • WritingForJuan wrote on 14 January, 2011, 0:18

    Firstly, I would like to commend you for writing this article. Konti nalang ang nagsusulat para talakayin ang mga ganitong bagay.. Hihingi na ko ng pasensya kung hindi ko sasang-ayunan yung ibang mga punto mo sa blog na ‘to (Well, just for courtesy, brother. I know it won’t matter kung magsorry ako o hindi)

    Oo. Third World country tayo. Oo. Bulok ang sistema natin. At oo, maraming Pilipino ang madalas nanlalamang pa sa kapwa nila Pilipino. Just as what Mahatma Gandhi stated: “Be the change you want to see in this world”

    Minsan, nagiging sakit na nating magreklamo. (I, personally) Pero madalas di natin naiisip, na wala tayong karapatang magreklamo kung tayo mismo walang ginagawa para mabago yung sitwasyon ng bayan.

    “I speak English better than I speak Tagalog or whatever my regional ethnic language is. So what? I’m still Filipino. I don’t use authoritarianism, don’t teach my kids to use “po” or “opo,” don’t teach them the mano tradition or I don’t raise them the traditional way, but use modern parenting methods. So what? I’m still Filipino. I believe our culture is filled with a lot of trash and we’re doing the wrong things compared to what our neighbors like Singapore and Indonesia are doing. So what? I’m still Filipino. Heck, even if I don’t say “I’m Proud to be Filipino,” or “the Filipino Race is superior,” I’m still Filipino.”

    Hindi masamang matuto ng ibang lenggwahe. Pero hindi ba dapat una kang maging bihasa sa paggamit ng sarili mong wika? Nakakahiyang sabihing “Pilipino ako” kung ako mismo e nahihirapang tangkilinin yung salita ng lupang sinilangan ko?

    Ang pagmamano at paggamit ng po at opo ay mga kaugalian na nagpapakita ng mayamang tradisyon nating mga Pilipino. Mas mabuting napepreserba natin ang mga pamanang ito ng ating mga ninuno. Kaya siguro walang nararating ang mga Pilipino ay dahil hindi natin nirerespeto ang pinagmulan natin. Respeto. Isa sa pagpapakita ng respeto sa mga kaugaliang Pilipino ay ang paggamit at patuloy na pagpapayabong nito.

    At hindi tamang ikumpara ang Pilipinas sa Indonesia at Singapore. Hindi tayo sila. Kung mabubuhay tayong nagpapakamiserable dahil ikinukumpara natin ang bansa nila sa atin, patuloy lang tayong mahihiya at magtatago sa anino ng mga mauunlad na bansang ito.

    Aren’t you proud of being a FIlipino? hindi mo ba ipinagmamalaki ang katapangan ng ating mga bayani upang ipagtanggol ang ating kalayaan mula sa mga mananakop? Para sa akin, ang bandila ng ating bansa ang pinakamagandang bandila sa buong kalawakan. At naniniwala ako na ang lahing Pilipino ay isang lahing puno ng dangal.

    “Even if I seem to be an overly logical person and would rather think critically than let my emotions do the thinking, I’m still Filipino.”

    I may not be as intelligent as you are. But I’m quite sure that this statement above is a fallacy. Hasty Generalization. :)

    “I believe the jeepney should be eliminated or reduced as a form of transportation to improve our poor metro traffic situation. So what? I’m still Filipino.”

    Why should the Jeepney be eliminated/reduced? You want a product of Filipino ingeniousness go to waste? Instead of blaming the Jeepneys, why not YOU propose a plan to improve the poor traffic situation in the Metro? (or at least give every Filipino family their own car and a weekly ration of gasoline to reduce the use of public transportation) and the Magnificent Jeepney may rest it’s tired and abused body to Museums all over the Philippines.

    These are just only some points I would like you guys to ponder on. Naniniwala akong kaya pa nating umarangkada gaya ng mga Jeep natin ngayon. Let our bite be bigger than our bark. Tumulong na lang tayo. Wag tayong magreklamo ng magreklamo kung wala naman taong ginagawa para mapaunlad ang bansang to. Pare-parehas lang nating gusto ng pagbabago. Magtulungan tayo.

    Again, I salute you for being such a brave writer.

    Peace and love to all of you.

    To God be the glory.

    [Reply]

    rubberkid Reply:


    If jeepneys are so ingenious, then why are they still so un-aerodynamic? Why don’t they have safety features?

    [Reply]


    pera. pare. pera. kya kung sa kaya. naniniwala ako. pera ang laging problema.

    the americans said, that the jeepney ”is unsafe at any speed”. di rin. kahit anong sasakyan naman. nasa pagmamaneho lang ang problema.

    enough of egocentricity. masakit man isipin, pero madami talagang mahihirap sa Pilipinas. Dalawang baga siguro kulang satin. Disiplina at malasakit sa kapwa. sige. dagdagan natin ng safet features ang jeep. improve the model. tapos, mahalan ang pamasahe. yung mga hindi nga gaanong may kaya ngayon, nahihirapan na sa incrased fare rate. tapos magmamahal pa ulit. Im speaking of “ngayon”.

    isa pa. kaya tayo minamata ng ibang nationalities kasi tayong mga Pilipino mismo mababa ang moral sa sarili. kung makapanlait tayo kesyo “ang ganto ng Pilipinas” o “Ang ganyan ng mga Pilipino” eh parang hindi tayo nakatira sa bansang to at hindi tayo Pilipino.

    Ang sukatan ng pagiging Pilipino ay hindi lang dahil sa Jus Saguinis.

    Pilipino ka. Iangat mo ang kapwa mo Pilipino.

    [Reply]

    Jay Reply:


    Pilipino ka. Iangat mo ang kapwa mo Pilipino.

    BWAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAAHH!!!

    Amf parang socialism yan ah! Pantay pantay po para lahat ay meron kahit ang mga iba ay ginagawa ang lahat para mag tyaga habang ang mga inutil na di nag ta trabaho ay gusto kin ma payapa pero ayaw gumawa ng sariling paraan.

    pera. pare. pera. kya kung sa kaya. naniniwala ako. pera ang laging problema.

    Wow that is odd. Philippines have no problem with money. They can borrow all they want from foreign multi-nationals. The problem is what they do WITH IT!

    Why should the Jeepney be eliminated/reduced? You want a product of Filipino ingeniousness go to waste?

    Its a waste from the start anyway as Manila was not built for the numbers it is supporting now, hence why even public transportation is even having issues dealing with the sheer number of people.

    Oo. Third World country tayo. Oo. Bulok ang sistema natin.

    I wonder why. Usapan Ghandi ka pa eh kung gusto ng mga tao makipag action at maki-sama at mag pakita ng sovereignty, sa mga walang kwentang isyu. Ayaw pumayag na i-push ang FOIA. Ayaw pumayag sa concepto ng Charter Change. Ayaw magpakita ng suporta sa tamang justicia sa mga hindi pinaparusahan. Pero run for Pasig dahil nag papasikat? Pwede! Kahit man di pina pansin kung panu nangyayari ang pagdumi nun.

    At hindi tamang ikumpara ang Pilipinas sa Indonesia at Singapore. Hindi tayo sila.

    Totoo yun. Dahil pumayag ang mga singaporean na sunduhin ang sapat na lider na may vision at goals para makagawa ng mapayapang sociedad at foundation sa kanilang sapat na sistema na gobierno! Ang mga pinoy di kaya gayahin yun at kay sa gayahin ang singapore, japan at south korea na ayusin ang kanilang bansa dahil mahal nila at nagawa din, ang mga pinoy ay pinabayan ang ka saysayan at laging sasabihin na ma awa daw ang mga iba sa kanila.

    Nakakahiyang sabihing “Pilipino ako” kung ako mismo e nahihirapang tangkilinin yung salita ng lupang sinilangan ko?

    Ang lalim bro. Nung natandahan ko, ang pilipinas ay hindi maynila at luzon. Yung mga taga baguio at mountain region, hindi marunong mag tagalog pero marunong mag ingles at ilokano. Mga bisayan, mahina sa tagalog pero marunong din sa wika nila at ingles. Lalo na taga Mindanao! Pwes, sayang kapag di ka pinananganak sa lupang di taga ilog. At dahil doon, ki na pwede sabihin na Pilipino. AW!

    Aren’t you proud of being a FIlipino?

    Ang pagiging pinanganak na pinoy ay accidente, hindi galing sa gawa. Paano ipagmalalaki ang isang bagay na hindi mo pinag tyagan at pinahirapan, at isang bagay na pinag hirapan ng magulang mo?

    I may not be as intelligent as you are. But I’m quite sure that this statement above is a fallacy. Hasty Generalization

    I’m quite certain that you like to think with your emotions rather than think rationally, hence why you are prone to making hasty generalizations that prove what the Filipino people are sadly, in general.

    Pero madalas di natin naiisip, na wala tayong karapatang magreklamo kung tayo mismo walang ginagawa para mabago yung sitwasyon ng bayan.

    Ikan ba sa isang karapatan na kasama sa isang demokrasya ay pwedeng mag bigay criticismo at mag reklamo ng sapat? Lalo kapag may ebidensya para suportahan ang punto na yun? Dahil di maririnig ng mga pinaupo ng mga tao at mga taong bayan kung saan nagkukulang ang sistema.

    kung makapanlait tayo kesyo “ang ganto ng Pilipinas” o “Ang ganyan ng mga Pilipino” eh parang hindi tayo nakatira sa bansang to at hindi tayo Pilipino.

    Kay sa wag natin pansinin ang mga problema natin at maghanap ng mga solusyon para mas maging matatag at epektibo tayo sa pag desisyon at kilos natin? Sa behavior lang, kilala na nga ang pinoy eh. Ma itatago mo pa ba yan sa mga ibang nationalities? Syempre hindi.

    ang tamang pagbago ay intidihin ang maayos kung saan nga nagkulang. Dahil kung hindi, pa ulit ulit lang ang ka saysayan natin. Walang nag iba sa nangyari sa lolo mo, tatay mo at sa panahon mo kung ganon. At totoo din dahil ganon na rin ang ka saysayan ng Pilipinas noong 1942 hanggang 2011.

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