Friday, March 27, 2015

PNoy still unapologetic for authorising suspended PNP chief Purisima to oversee Mamasapano operation

March 27, 2015
by Ilda
They say never let the day end without apologizing to someone you have offended. Otherwise, if you wait a long time before saying, “I’m SORRY”, feelings of anger could fester and as master Yoda would say, “anger leads to hate” and by the time you finally apologize, it could be too late.
For Philippine President Benigno Simeon (BS) Aquino, the words “I’m sorry” seems to be the hardest words to say. It could be because the concept behind the term “apology” is an alien concept to him. It could also be because the act of apologizing was not something he had to do much while growing up in a sheltered environment. Either way, members of the public who were angered by his actions pretty much hate him now. This was evident in the latest survey, which saw the President’s approval rating go down from 59 percent in NOVEMBER 2014 to 38 percent in March 2015.
'Sorry' seems to be the hardest word to say for Philippine President BS Aquino.
‘Sorry’ seems to be the hardest word to say for Philippine President BS Aquino.
Apparently, two months after the tragic event dubbed the Mamasapano Clash – a gun battle that ensued between members of the Philippine National Police Special Action Forces and Moro Islamic Liberation Front – which resulted in the deaths of 44 SAF officers, BS Aquino seems to think that the public can still WAITfor an apology that might not EVEN come. For now, he is merely seeking “understanding” for his role in the operation from the public.
Yes, BS Aquino wants the public to understand him but the problem is, he hasn’t said the right words that could motivate the public to understand his position. His latest speech during the Philippine National Police Academy commencement EXERCISES at Camp General Mariano Castañeda in Silang only reinforced the public’s view that their “leader” is insensitive particularly at a time of national mourning and lacks the strength of character to take accountability for his actions.
Similar to BS Aquino’s previous speeches immediately after the Mamasapano clash, his latest speech conveniently left out the fact that he authorized a suspended PNP Chief Alan Purisima to oversee a major operation. Clearly, BS Aquino wants the public to forget that he ignored the preventive suspension order issued to Purisima by the Office of the Ombudsman in CONNECTION with a supposed anomalous contract the PNP entered into with a courier service in 2011.
It seems BS Aquino would do anything to SAVE himself, including contradict his own statements. Previously, he said that his mobile phone was off and that he could not be reached while the tragedy was unfolding; but now he is claiming that his interpretation of the text MESSAGES from Purisima earlier in the day was “without urgency”. To quote BS Aquino:
“From what was texted, it appeared to me as if the operation in Mamasapano had ended, or was coming to an end, because mechanized UNITS and artillery were already providing assistance.”
Suspended but in command: Former Philippine police chief Alan Purisima
Suspended but in command: Former Philippine POLICE chief Alan Purisima
What he’s trying to say is, he didn’t feel the need to do anything because he thought things were under control. There is a Filipino saying that aptly describes BS Aquino’s predicament “Maraming namamatay sa maling akala.” Loosely translated, a lot of people die because of flawed assumptions. He can only blame himself for that.
The real mystery here is why BS Aquino and Purisima were using text messaging during a deadly operation. Could it be that even Purisima, who was BS Aquino’s preferred point of contact, also didn’t realize the urgency of the situation because he was not in the PNP’s office environment due to his suspension? Or could it be that Purisima was simply not even in “work mode” at that time due to his suspension? He could even have had his feet up in a relaxed environment at home in his “White House” while texting. That could explain why his text messages to BS Aquino were “without urgency”. BS Aquino should realize that speaking to Purisima on the phone and hearing the voices of his staff could have made a huge difference and could have helped him analyze the sense of urgency of the situation.
Had Purisima been in the PNP command post, he would have been in constant radio communication with PNP SAF chief Director Getulio Napeñas during the operation and would have been able to radio the Armed Forces of the Philippines for help instead of exchanging text MESSAGES with his buddy, BS Aquino. Unfortunately, since he was suspended, Purisima probably had to be discreet in coordinating between Napenas and BS Aquino. He then failed to contact the AFP in time to rescue the SAFs who were still alive at 5am. He broke his word to Napenas that he’d take care of contacting the head of the military.
SAF commander Getulio Napenas: Unable to ignore BS Aquino's buddy Alan Purisima
SAF commander Getulio Napenas: Unable to ignore BS Aquino’s buddy Alan Purisima
It was wrong for BS Aquino to put a suspended PNP Chief in charge of a major operation particularly when Purisima’s role was kept a secret from the acting PNP Chief Director General Leonardo Espina. BS Aquino insists that he ordered Purisima to INFORM Espina about the operation. It would have been wiser had the President insisted on including Espina in the briefings he had with Purisma and Napenas about Oplan Exodus in the first place. BS Aquino’s misguided trust in Purisima was a mistake that should not go unpunished. As for Napenas, he was just following “orders” from Purisima not to inform Espina and Interior Secretary Manuel “Mar” Roxas II about the operation. It would have been hard for Napenas to ignore Purisima’s orders since he was the President’s buddy.
BS Aquino is good at muddling the issue and hopes that people will move on from the tragedy by saying this would be the last occasion he’ll speak on the issue. Despite not being transparent about what he knows and leaving the public in the dark, he said he is saddened that people come up with “speculations” instead of “facts”. He appears angry at not being asked before coming up with reports, referring to the Senate and the BOI reports. It’s as if it is easy for anyone to ask him. On the contrary, the people around him and his allies in government actually protect him from being asked. Some members of the House of Representatives PLAN to invite Aquino during their inquiry into Mamasapano but their idea was “shot-down” by Speaker Feliciano Belmonte Jr.
BS Aquino should be reminded that three DAYS AFTER the Mamasapano clash, media correspondents during a press conference did ask him about what he knew but he didn’t want to answer simple questions like, say, what Purisima’s role was in the operation despite knowing full well what it was.
Had BS Aquino admitted to his error in judgment and asked for an apology immediately after the tragic event in Mamasapano, the public could have moved on sooner. Instead, the issue has dragged on for weeks because of his arrogance. Unfortunately for him, the public has noted his inconsistencies and insincerity. Only the most gullible and his most rabid supporters buy his lame excuses. Their numbers CONTINUE to get smaller.

Ilda

In life, things are not always what they seem.

Lee Kuan Yew and the Singapore he built is proof that the Philippines did it all wrong

March 26, 2015
by benign0
Rest in peace Mr Lee Kuan Yew.
LKY represents everything latter-day Filipino politicians are not. He had a vision for Singapore and the courage to break ground where lesser folk beholden to the popular sentiment feared to tread. The COUNTRY LKY built is a stark in-your-face reminder that just about every “contributing factor” Filipinos, their leaders, and their so-called “intellectuals” cite to excuse the chronic failure of their society to achieve and prosper are but sad words coming from a sad PEOPLE.
lee_kuan_yew
While the Philippines stood out as America’s “democracy” pin-up girl in the 1950s, Singapore was an outcast. Shunned by the Malay Federation, menaced by Indonesia, and abandoned by the British Empire, LKY took leadership of a state that had very reasonable excuses to curl up on the floor and fail. It had none of the essential natural resources needed to industrialise, was wracked by internal ethnic strife, and lacked an identity beyond its former STATUS as a Malay Federation state.

Filipinos like to think that freedom is a pre-requisite for prosperity. LKY’s Singapore disproved that long before it was even turned into a brand by Filipino activists. LKY ran Singapore with an iron fist. There was no “revolution” to break that tight grip. The only revolutionary thing that happened in Singapore was economic. Whereas Filipinos celebrate a political “revolution”, Singapore quietly achieved an economic one.
Indeed, the best revenge is success. Singapore now dominates the region. The economic output of one Singaporean dwarfs that of a Filipino and his family of eight by a factor of ten. To the Philippines’ ability to “secure” an outlying territory by beaching a World War II era ship, Singapore, a country of just several million, can project hundreds of times the firepower many miles beyond its territory. It also keeps a significant chunk of the Philippines’ work force EMPLOYED.
What can Filipinos LEARN from LKY and Singapore?
A lot. Trouble is, they refuse to. One thing’s for sure, democracy certainly cannot be counted as one of LKY’s most favourite things. Yet Filipinos regard their hoplessly chaotic brand of demo-crazy as their country’s crowning “achievement”. To this day, the Philippines’ legions of has-been celebrity “activists” and discredited “intellectuals” CONTINUE to sing hymns about by-gone “champions” of “freedom” and lead their flock lighting candles before monuments to their world-renowned voodoo politics. In contrast to the stoic way Singaporeans and their leaders faced the challenges ahead of them, Filipinos routinely wail and rant about the imaginary “anti-progress” bogeymen their revered demagogues put up to demonise giving them big English names that, ironically, defy translation into the vernacular: Corruption, Cronyism, Nepotism, Imperialism, blah blah blah.
You’d think the solution to “solving” Philippine poverty is to “elminate” those “evils” of society. Yet the very leaders Filipino voters foolishly entrust to do just that are, themselves, the sources and embodiments of those “evils”. Indeed, for most Filipino politicians, corruption, cronyism, nepotism, and imperialism areentire ways of life!
What exactly has democracy and the much-touted “freedom” its adherents enjoy delivered to Filipinos? Perhaps Filipinos uphold a misguided notion of what it means to be free. If “freedom” to Filipinos has come to mean being free to elect idiots to top leadership positions, being free to flood an entire consumer MARKET with useless trinkets made in China, and free to feed trashy media products to an already ignorant star-struck population, it is likely that a radical re-evaluation of that notion is overdue. LKY did not pretend to be a big fan of that sort of freedom to gain the global respect he now commands and to build a society every Third World government aspires to build. As such, he is often criticised for his “autocratic” ways.
No. LKY’s Singapore offers a readily-evident freedom that is ironically alien to apologists of failed democracies such as that of the Philippines’.
Yes, Lee Kuan Yew was not a paragon of the kind of democracy that throws up populist political leaders. Yes, his acerbic remarks would never have won a TV debate or an election in the U.S. But he was not one of the self-serving, corrupt dictators that developing countries produce so often. It would be folly to deny him his due credit for building a nation regularly listed as the world’s best place to LIVE.
Spoken like a true Singaporean. LKY would’ve been proud.

Wednesday, March 25, 2015

Wall Street Journal Names Barack Obama As The Most Unprepared Man


Wall Street Journal Names Barack Obama As The Most Unprepared Man of the...
This is not a ‘hate piece’, but it IS a brutally frank article from the Wall Street Journal.
Please read and share. It looks longer than it is. It’s a quick read.
Wall Street
A "deadly" article regarding Obama, at the Wall Street Journal, which today is the most widely circulated newspaper in America.
Article from the Wall Street Journal - by Alan Caruba:
"I have this theory about Barack Obama. I think he's led a kind of make-believe life in which money was provided and doors were opened because at some point early on somebody or some group (George Soros, maybe? or Frank Marshall Davis??) took a look at this tall, good looking, half-white, half-black, young man with an exotic African/Muslim name and concluded he could be guided toward a life in politics where his facile speaking skills could even put him in the White House.
In a very real way, he has been a young man in a very big hurry. Who else do you know has written two memoirs before the age of 45? "Dreams of My Father" was published in 1995 when he was only 34 years old. The "Audacity of Hope" followed in 2006. If, indeed, he did write them himself. There are some who think that his mentor and friend, Bill Ayers, a man who calls himself a "communist with a small 'c' was the real author.
His political skills consisted of rarely voting on anything that might be deemed controversial. He went from a legislator in the Illinois House to the Senator from that state because he had the good fortune of having Mayor Daley's formidable political machine at his disposal.
He was in the U.S. Senate so briefly that his bid for the presidency was either an act of astonishing self-confidence or part of some greater game plan that had been determined before he first stepped foot in the Capital. How, many must wonder, was he selected to be a 2004 keynote speaker at the Democrat convention that nominated John Kerry when virtually no one had ever even heard of him before?
He out maneuvered Hillary Clinton in primaries. He took Iowa by storm. A charming young man, an anomaly in the state with a very small black population, he oozed "cool" in a place where agriculture was the antithesis of cool. He dazzled the locals. And he had an army of volunteers drawn to a charisma that hid any real substance.
And then he had the great good fortune of having the Republicans select one of the most inept candidates for the presidency since Bob Dole. And then John McCain did something crazy. He picked Sarah Palin, an unknown female governor from the very distant state of Alaska . It was a ticket that was reminiscent of 1984's Walter Mondale and Geraldine Ferraro and they went down to defeat.
The mainstream political media fell in love with him. It was a schoolgirl crush with febrile commentators like Chris Mathews swooning then and now over the man. The venom directed against McCain and, in particular, Palin, was extraordinary.
Now, 6 full years into his presidency, all of those gilded years leading up to the White House have left him unprepared to be President. Left to his own instincts, he has a talent for saying the wrong thing at the wrong time. It swiftly became a joke that he could not deliver even the briefest of statements without the ever-present Tele-Prompters.
Far worse, however, is his capacity to want to "wish away" some terrible realities, not the least of which is the Islamist intention to destroy America and enslave the West. Any student of history knows how swiftly Islam initially spread. It knocked on the doors of Europe, having gained a foothold in Spain.
The great crowds that greeted him at home or on his campaign "world tour" were no substitute for having even the slightest grasp of history and the reality of a world filled with really bad people with really bad intentions. Oddly and perhaps even inevitably, his political experience, a cakewalk, has positioned him to destroy the Democrat Party's hold on power in Congress because in the end it was never about the Party. It was always about his communist ideology, learned at an early age from family, mentors, college professors, and extreme leftist friends and colleagues.
Obama is a man who could deliver a snap judgment about a Boston police officer who arrested an "obstreperous" Harvard professor-friend, but would warn Americans against "jumping to conclusions" about a mass murderer at Fort Hood who shouted "Allahu Akbar." The absurdity of that was lost on no one. He has since compounded this by calling the Christmas bomber "an isolated extremist" only to have to admit a day or two later that he was part of an al Qaeda plot.
He is a man who could strive to close down our detention facility at Guantanamo even though those released were known to have returned to the battlefield against America. He could even instruct his Attorney General to afford the perpetrator of 9/11 a civil trial when no one else would ever even consider such an obscenity. And he is a man who could wait three days before having anything to say about the perpetrator of yet another terrorist attack on Americans and then have to elaborate on his remarks the following day because his first statement was so lame.
The pattern repeats itself. He either blames any problem on the Bush administration or he naively seeks to wish away the truth.
Knock, knock. Anyone home? Anyone there? Barack Obama exists only as the sock puppet of his handlers, of the people who have maneuvered and manufactured this pathetic individual's life.
When anyone else would quickly and easily produce a birth certificate, this man spent over a million dollars to deny access to his. Most other documents, the paper trail we all leave in our wake, have been sequestered from review. He has lived a make-believe life whose true facts remain hidden.
Even his wife has mentioned they visited the country of his birth, Kenya. You did note she did not accompany him on the trip to Saudi Arabia on which he actually bowed to the king. Being a muslim required him to do so and that same faith prevented him from taking her with him . "
We laugh at the ventriloquist's dummy, but what do you do when the dummy is President of the United States.
We the people are coming!
Only 86% will send this on. Should be a 100%.
Please send it on if only to one person.

Power, Pride and Typical Pinoys: A Disastrous Combination

March 25, 2015
by Grimwald
After reading the Lord of the Rings and watching the FILM adaptations, one of the clearest messages of the franchise is how absolute power corrupts absolutely. While Smeagol, the halfling that would one day become the ghoulish creature known as Gollum, started off as an unpleasant but not inherently evil being, the One Ring and the power it offered him changed him into the pale bestial horror the fandom knows him as. Now that I have time to look at the story in retrospect, the One Ring, if you take away its supernatural natural, seems all too mundane but nonetheless very dangerous.
apathy
I know that a lot of people might not appreciate this observation, but I can often compare the typical, apathetic and air-headed Pinoy to Smeagol. Being an island people, our means of travel is often limited and most of what we know about the world beyond our country or even beyond just our island comes from second-hand information or news media (with most of the local ones being largely biased). Like the hobbits of Middle-Earth, we Filipinos often LIVE apart from the rest of the world and are rarely ever involved in matters at large. While this does ensure that we are usually safe from the dangers that threaten other nations, this will not protect us from all dangers like terrorism, natural disasters and the ever-present threat of conflict should it ever come to that.

Unlike the hobbits of Middle-Earth however, who take the time to record and study their history and, while they disdain technology, still appreciate the knowledge that is used to come up with them, many Filipinos disdain knowledge and favor ignorance. This actually makes us more similar to the halflings of the Warhammer world rather than that of those from Middle-Earth but that’s going beyond the point here. Now, with ignorant masses with little in the way of common sense, imagine what will happen when you offer them a little power…
In this article here by rsurtida, it shows just how some Filipinos are all too eager to abuse what even little power that they have available to them. In this case even your garden-variety PUV driver is more than willing to flaunt what power he has to his passengers as if trying to imply to them that they either have to work with him or else. In any other country, a PUV driver takes care to watch out for his passengers as any damage to them can be used against him.
Majority of Filipinos have a misplaced sense of pride and I doubt anyone can readily contest that. There is the right kind of pride that lends itself to a sense of responsibility which, unfortunately, many Filipinos seem to lack. Instead, Pinoys resort to a pride that has more to do with entitlement instead of responsibility, holding what powers they have over others like a loaded gun.
Here is a short demonstration of how power should work:
Ambulance Driver: “So you’re in the next city over? Okay, I’m heading there right now!”
Caller: “Please hurry, my grandfather just had a heart attack!”
Ambulance Driver: “Don’t worry, I’ll be there as soon as I can!”
Caller: “I’m sorry if this is inconvenient, but we really need your help.”
Ambulance Driver: “Hey, I’m an ambulance driver, it’s my responsibility to get help to people no matter how far they are!”
Unfortunately in the Philippines, this happens instead:
Ambulance Driver: “But that’s in the next city over, that’s a bit far…”
Caller: “My grandfather just had a heart attack and you’re the closest hospital there is.”
Ambulance Driver: “Look, we’re running a tight schedule here so don’t expect us to make any exceptions for you!” (even if he’s not really doing anything)
Caller: “Alright, I’ll pay you EXTRA for gas.”
Ambulance Driver: “Okay, it’s good you understand that our SERVICES don’t come cheap. We’re on our way.”
With that in mind you realize just what kind of mindset Filipinos have. In the Philippines, positions of power and authority are not considered a responsibility like they do in more developed countries, here it is essentially a weapon to be brandished and used against others. I have been taught by my grandfather to respect firearms as they are very lethal and that people don’t really need to know that you have them unless they break into your HOME or hurt your loved ones. However, I have also encountered numerous people who also have similar access to firearms who do nothing but boast about their weapons, their alleged “proficiency” with them and feel free to look down on other people who do not own them.
Looking back on the cartoons I’ve watched, I once remembered an episode of Conan the Adventurer where Dregs, the chief but often incompetent minion of the main guy was granted power to rule over the serpent man army in the absence of his master. Instead of keeping things in order, Dregs ruined his master’s empire spectacularly and it was only through an accident on the part of the heroes that Dregs was able to retain some of the empire’s power when his master returned. Most Pinoys are all too similar to Dregs who’s all too eager to try out their new powers and flaunt their new found wealth or power to other people. Unfortunately, while more progressive people can probably avoid being becoming beholden to such displays of wealth and power, Pinoys are all too eager to bow down and submit to people who are rich, powerful and, most of all, famous. It doesn’t matter whether the said person is immoral, cruel or possibly insane as long as they’re powerful and famous, you can BET that a large number of Filipinos will even see them as gods.
So yeah, Spider-Man would probably vomit if he suddenly found himself in the Philippines. Power should come with a sense of responsibility, a knowledge that it is your duty to use whatever power you have with discipline and self-control, not something to be used to control and abuse others. With our current leaders and authority figures shouting “Do you know who I am?” and saying “What’s in it for me?”, then I think it would be best if we just relinquish our positions of power to institutions that would have a better understanding of them.

Grimwald

Thaddeus Grimwald is an avid writer and supporter of the GRP website and writes his own fiction in his ownGrow Up Philippines website. To check out his works of fiction, you can check the following: Hired Help.